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Articles » Skills » Fishing Rigs » How to Tie a Mojo Rig For Bass Fishing

How to Tie a Mojo Rig For Bass Fishing

The Mojo Rig is great for catching bass.

mojo rig how to tie
Mojo rig ensures a finesse technique for catching bass. Source: Karl

It’s your go-to efficient rig that is the right blend of your classic Carolina rig and Split shot rig – just in between aggressive and subtle. 

What You’ll Need

  • Mojo Weight – weight size may vary depending on what you’re comfortable using 
  • Rubber Peg
  • Hook – your go-to fishing hook will be best to use for a more comfortable bass fishing
  • Plastic Bait – any plastic lure will do, but during tough winter or high-pressure fishing fronts, you want to use a dark-colored lure
  • Leader line – always remember when the fishing gets tougher, the leader goes longer
  • Scissors/ Clippers/ Fishing Pliers – to use when you need to cut any excess line as your dentist won’t be so happy if you use your teeth

Mojo Rig Setup

How To Tie A Mojo Rig

Rigging the Mojo setup is slightly different from the Carolina rig, but this technique is easy to try and considered one of the best bass fishing techniques. 

  1. Take your leader line and rubber peg. Put the peg through the little loop and pull on to your line
  2. Take your Mojo weight and slide it onto your line.
  3. Take another rubber peg and slide through the little loop all along until it hits the Mojo weight. 
  4. Grab your go-to fishing hook and feed it through.
  5. Tie a knot to secure before cutting the excess line with a pair of scissors or clippers.
  6. Rig your plastic lure or bait through the hook, and you’re good to go! 

How to Use Mojo Rig

Bottom fishing in the weeds is best and effective with a Mojo rig as it will just slip through them better than the fishing rigs: split-shot rig or the Carolina rig.

You want to trail a lot of line in deeper water to let the rig move more naturally when fishing for bass. According to a pro, you need not worry about your line being motored over by some boat as stirring up the water can turn your bass fishing on with this finesse fishing rig.

One way to fish with a Mojo rig is to drive over your target spot, drop the rig, and let it fall and another way is to make a long cast with it. 

Mojo Rig vs. Carolina Rig

The Carolina rig is useful when fishing a deeper and more open water type that allows anglers to present the Bait in front of the aggressive bass. The mojo rig is perfect for more challenging situations where there are many grass or weeds around. 

Alternative Rigs for Bass Fishing

Neko Rig

The weighted version of a Wacky Rig is the Neko Rig, and it is one rig that is familiar to the bass fishing community. The Neko Rig is rigged with the weight inserted into just one end of the soft plastic for a unique bait action while falling at the bottom. This allows the Bait to stand straight when hitting the bottom of the water. 

Ned Rig                                      

The Ned Rig uses a small chunk of a soft plastic stick bait threaded onto a light jighead. It is useful for bass anglers fishing in tough conditions or pressured waters as it excels when it gets tough. This rig has a small profile, subtle action, and it mimics several bass food sources.

Split Shot Rig

A finesse fishing version of a fish finding rig is the Split Shot Rig, which is known to work best in fairly shallow water. You can work this cast and crank rig deeper than 20 feet, but the sensitivity decreases as the depth increases. 

Frequently Asked Questions

How do you store Mojo rigs?

One angler says you can use a PVC pipe and put it in a 5-gallon bucket. Use the lines to hang the mojos from the hooks. 

Can you use tungsten/lead worm weights with a bobber stop or rubber peg instead of Mojo weights?

One angler suggests using tungsten worm weights with bobber stops on either side as tungsten has a smaller profile to come through cover better, but others think that if you don’t use the Mojo weights, it wouldn’t be a Mojo rig. But whichever way you prefer, as long as you get to bag your catch, it should be okay. 


The Anglers Behind This Article:

Sushmita Lo
Editor

Jon Stenstrom
Founder

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